Simplifying Sympathy Flowers

Flowers are a wonderful way to communicate thoughts and feelings in times when words just aren’t enough. We love to send and receive them on joyous occasions such as birthdays, holidays, anniversaries, achievements and milestones.

But flowers also play a very important role in some of life’s most somber moments as well because of their ability to express sincere sympathy and lend support to those grieving over the lost a loved one when no words will do.

For many, ordering sympathy flowers can be a confusing and intimidating task, especially when you consider the circumstances, emotions, and responsibilities that you are suddenly forced to handle without much prior notice or time for planning. It can feel very intimidating, but your friends at Durocher Florist are here to help guide you through the process and address any questions or concerns that you have in order to put your mind at ease.

Selecting the flowers

Reflections of Gratitude Casket Spray by Durocher Florist

When deciding on sympathy or funeral flowers, the first thing to consider is your relationship with the deceased. Traditionally, the immediate family selects a memorial wreath or casket spray for the service. Close family and friends often opt for personalized floral tributes that reflect the deceased’s personality, occupation, hobbies or passions. These flowers are typically displayed during the funeral service.

Other friends, relatives, and co-workers have many other options available including plants and simple floral baskets which can either be used for the service itself or sent to the home of the bereaved. The best choice in this instance are flowers that reflect the personality or relationship with the deceased as many modern funeral services focus on the celebration of life more so than mourning the passing.

When to send flowers

Timing varies greatly depending upon several factors, but a good rule of thumb is to order funeral flowers at least 24 hours in advance of the funeral or memorial service, and even 48 hours for larger pieces like wreaths or sprays. Many funeral homes prefer to have the flowers in place several hours before the ceremony, so the earlier you order, the better. This also helps the florist by reducing the number of deliveries they need to make.

Sympathy flowers that are intended for the family and not the service may be sent directly to the home. The timing of these deliveries isn’t particularly as important, so any time after the service is over is appropriate.

In lieu of flowers

There is often some confusion when obituaries contain the phrase: “In Lieu of Flowers.” Contrary to popular belief, this terminology does not mean that the family does not want flowers. If that were the case, the phrase “please omit” would be used instead. It does, however, indicate that you have the option of making a donation instead of – or in addition to – sending flowers. Unless specifically stated, flowers are always an appropriate symbol of sympathy.

Other things to consider

With so many different types of memorial services and so many other variables based on religion, cultural, or family preferences, understanding funeral etiquette is not always a simple task. At Durocher Florist, we’re here to help you make an appropriate selection and choose a thoughtful gift when filling your funeral flower order.

When words just aren’t enough…

Beautiful Heart Bouquet by Durocher Florist

The most important thing to remember is that a gift of flowers can make a big difference for grieving family members and friends. It can often speak louder than words and lets them know you are thinking of them during one of the most difficult times in their lives.

Your friends at Durocher Florist will help you find the right type of arrangement, and we are happy to offer guidance and suggestions if you’re unsure which style or design you wish to send. After you order, you can rest assured knowing that we will handle all the details to make sure your flowers are delivered to the proper place, at the proper time.

Ready to Pop the Question? Don’t Forget the Flowers!

One of life’s most important decisions is deciding on the right partner and starting a new chapter together as a married couple. But before that can happen, someone has to pop the question!

Dozen Red Roses – Hand Tied by Durocher Florist

If this is your situation then hopefully you’ve already identified the lucky person and more importantly – are reasonably sure that they will say “yes.” It also helps immensely to have the ring on hand for this occasion, but that isn’t always a deal-breaker.

Now comes the fun part – formulating a plan that will be both memorable and romantic. Unless your fiancée-to-hopefully-be is a die-hard avid sports fan who loves the spotlight, you can go ahead and cross ‘proposing on the jumbotron of a large sports stadium’ off that list. Not only has that been done to death, but it typically isn’t anywhere near as romantic as both partners are hoping for – you can do better.

The best ideas are the original ones, and it helps if you can incorporate something special that you and your partner enjoy together. Here are five creative ways to help you make the moment special, but don’t be afraid to modify them to suit your style and whatever you do…DON’T forget the flowers, because if you do, we can’t guarantee results!

For the Beach Lover

For this one, you will need an accomplice. Prior to your big question, you will meet up with said accomplice and carve out a shallow heart in the sand, fill it with rose petals and have them stand by the heart to ensure its perfection. Let you partner-in-crime know to step away from the heart when they see you coming, and to be camera ready, that way you can just “happen upon” the heart and get that photo! Once you reach that heart with your fiancée-to-be have them stand inside it as you go down on one knee.

For the Introvert

Leave a single long-stem rose on their pillow with the ring tucked inside the petals or strung on the steam with a love letter as to why you pick them. If your partner is shy or introverted they will likely appreciate the intimacy without the awkwardness of involving other people.

For the Adventurer

Take a dozen roses and attach memories to each one along with a clue as to where to find the next rose. Be waiting at the end with the last rose in hand. When they arrive, simply hand over the rose and propose.

For the Traditionalist

Make reservations at a favorite restaurant or pick out somewhere nice. There are fewer and fewer occasions to get dressed to the 9’s, but this is still one of them. Begin by sending flowers to them at work with a handwritten invitation to dinner. Prior to your arrival at the restaurant make sure the hostess knows that you plan to propose during dessert by having your server bring out champagne with your sweets. When the confusion sets in about why you ordered champagne, you’ll know the time is right.

For the Family

If your fiancée-to-be is extremely close to their family, consider asking them to get involved by being your messengers. Give each one of them a rose with a hand-written love note to present to your sweetheart throughout the day. Then, arrange to meet in a special spot at the end of the day so you can present the last rose and the ultimate reason for your love.

We hope these ideas help make your upcoming proposal amazing! Good luck and make sure to order your flowers early. No matter if you need the rose petals, the single long stems or dozens of flowers in her favorite shade, Durocher Florist is here to help!

Goodbye April Showers – Hello May Flowers!

While the lingering effects from a long, cold winter are finally starting to make way for a long overdue springtime, it still comes as a surprise to most of us that May is here already – but we couldn’t be happier, because April showers always bring May flowers!

May is the perfect time to celebrate with flowers – all month long! In fact, the very first day of the month is May Day – a celebration of spring that is traditionally celebrated by giving “May baskets” made up of flowers or sweets – or a combination of the two – that is usually left anonymously on the doorsteps of neighbors.

To many, this may seem like a strange way to celebrate a holiday, especially considering that the givers of May baskets would usually ring the doorbell and run away – leaving the recipient to open the door and find nothing but a basket of flowers!

In some communities, leaving a May basket at someone’s door was an excellent opportunity to express romantic interest because tradition called for the recipient to give chase and attempt to steal a kiss from the person who hung the basket. In other parts of the country, however, it was considered a disgrace if the flower giver was caught by the recipient.

May Day isn’t nearly as popular in this country as it was a century ago, and today the concept seems quaint and dated to many people in this era of text messages and Snapchat, but this throwback to simpler times is still an official holiday in 66 countries around the world.

While no longer as common in the United States, May Day celebrations still take place in some regions of the country. In Hawaii, May Day is known as Lei Day, which is a day to celebrate the culture of the island and Native Hawaiians.

Mother’s Day

Of course, the most obvious occasion for giving flowers during the month of May is Mother’s Day. This year we celebrate mom on Sunday, May 13.

Springtime Harmony by Durocher Florist

Mother’s Day is one of the biggest days of the year when it comes to flowers, greeting cards, phone calls and restaurant reservations – and with good reason. It’s often hard to find appropriate ways to express gratitude to someone so important and dear to us as our mothers, but nearly everyone loves flowers!

For florists, Mother’s Day is one of our busiest times of the year, and also one of our favorites. Unlike many of the other holidays were certain colors or types of flowers tend to dominate, (like red roses on Valentine’s Day) Mother’s Day typically offers more freedom to design something special and truly unique – that mom is sure to love!

Here at Durocher Florist, we’ve been planning for this special day since the end of Valentine’s Day, and we’re ready to help you find something perfect for your mom. We are featuring new designs especially for this season as well as some old favorites, and of course, we can always custom-design something especially for you so that you can truly give your mom a one-of-a-kind gift this Mother’s Day.

But That’s Not All…

Between Mother’s Day, May Day, and flowers popping up everywhere we turn, May is truly the month of flowers, but there are many more ways to celebrate with flowers this month.

Memorial Day is just around the corner – this year it falls on Monday, May 28. Traditionally observed as a day to honor those who have died in military service, this holiday also marks the unofficial start of summer. If you are attending a picnic or observance on Memorial Day, flowers are always an appropriate way to show gratitude and appreciation.

May is also the time for graduations for many students across the country, as well an excellent chance for a gift to say “thanks” to all those teachers and educators who worked so hard throughout the year.

Whatever your reason, say it with flowers this May with the help of your friends at Durocher Florist. No matter the occasion, we’re here to help you find the perfect gift. Give us a call or come in and see us for all your floral needs – and we hope your May is beautiful and bright!

Springtime Means Tulip Time!

Sometimes it feels like winter will never end, but every year around this time we’re inevitably rewarded with the wonders of spring. Of course, one of the most telling signs of spring – and one of our favorites – is the arrival of tulips!

Despite their brief blooming period, which ranges from a few days to just over a week, tulips are the world’s third most popular flower – trailing only roses and chrysanthemums. With their nearly perfect symmetry made up of elegant lines and rich vibrant colors, it’s no wonder why these beautiful flowers are so popular.

Native to central Asia, and later introduced to Turkey, tulips quickly became an important part of the Turkish culture and remain Turkey’s national flower.

Their popularity really took off around 1560, however, when the flowers were introduced to the Netherlands and were so prized there that they caused the entire economy to collapse. During the height of during that era, a single tulip bulb was worth more than ten times the annual income of a skilled craftsman – making them more valuable than most houses.

Sensational Spring by Durocher Florist

Today, the Dutch still lead the world in tulip production by growing and producing around three billion tulips each year, although the prices have dropped significantly since then.

As a member of the lily family, tulips are classified as herbaceous perennials, although their bulbs differ from other species in that they are living plants that house self-contained nutrients. When the bulb grows into the flower, the original bulb will disappear, and a clone bulb will form in its place.

Tulips have three petals and three sepals, which are almost the same size and shape as the petals making them appear to have six to a bulb. They can also be found in nearly every color of the rainbow with red being the most popular. Streaking tulips boast two colors instead of one solid color. This unique combination was originally the result of a viral infection, although in modern times this unusual coloring is a deliberate result of breeding.

No matter which color you choose, tulips are an intriguing flower with a rich history – and a terrific choice when sending flowers in the spring. Their extremely vibrant colors make a statement and they also look great in centerpieces for your home or office environment.

Say hello to spring with some tulips from Durocher Florist. We have many different options for every different occasion including one of our most popular designs, Sensational Spring. Call us today or order online to enjoy this wonderful springtime treat.

Did You Know?

  • There are more than 150 different species of tulips with over 3,000 different varieties known to exist.
  • Tulip petals are edible and can be used as a substitute for onions in many recipes, although many people find their taste extremely unpleasant.
  • Tulips continue to grow up to one extra inch after they’re cut.
  • Tulips will bend and twist to grow towards light – even in a vase.
  • By 1636, tulips were traded on exchanges in Dutch cities. The skyrocketing prices caused many people to become suddenly rich or lose fortunes overnight.
  • In the Netherlands, tulips represent the briefness of life, but in Turkish culture, they’re a symbol of paradise on earth and have achieved a nearly-divine status.
  • Tulips have a short lifespan that typically only lasts for 3-7 days.
  • A sap released by daffodils cause tulips to wilt if the two flowers are arranged together.
  • Paul McCartney and Fats Domino are among a list of people who have had tulips named after them.

Sending a Message on Valentine’s Day

You often hear the saying, “it’s the thought that counts.” That may be true, but the thought isn’t the only thing that counts – especially not to your valentine on this special day.

Imagine a scenario such as this: your valentine is hard at work on Valentine’s Day when a delivery driver opens the door and delivers a box to her colleague’s desk. She looks on in excitement and a bit of envy as her colleague opens the box and begins pulling out roses one-by-one, before arranging them in the accompanying vase. It’s Valentine’s Day, do you really want your valentine assembling their roses at work?

She thinks about you and wonders if a similar box will arrive for her, when suddenly the door bursts open and a man in a Durocher Florist shirt walks in with an eye-popping bouquet of the most vivid and beautiful long-stem red roses. She watches as the driver makes his way through the office, and tightly crosses her fingers in hopes of somehow willing the delivery man to not make a sudden turn before reaching her desk.

As much as she tries to hide her smile, it modestly grows wider and wider as the delivery man approaches. By now, co-workers are peeking around office doors and over cubicle walls. The colleague in the front of the office takes a break from arranging the last of her flowers to see where the elegant roses are headed.

When the delivery driver finally makes it to her desk and confirms that she is indeed the recipient, her first thought will undeniably be of you – and just how special you made her feel.

When you send flowers, you’re sending a message. It’s easy if all you want to say with that message is: “I’m thinking of you.” A quick phone call or a brief visit to any number of websites will easily convey that message just fine. But doesn’t your Valentine deserve a stronger message than that – especially if it doesn’t take any extra time or effort on your part to let her know how you really feel about her? Send a message this year – a message that lets her know she deserves the very best.

Sending roses on Valentine’s Day is a time-honored tradition, but not all roses are the same. Roses are beautiful, but fragile, flowers that need care and love – just like your Valentine. This year, think outside that battered box and send the very best message – by sending the very best roses. When you see or hear of roses being advertised at “special” prices, in most cases, you will need to add the shipping and handling along with some additional hidden fees. Suddenly, the remarkably-low price is no longer so low anymore.

At Durocher Florist, we would never stuff our roses in a box and drop them off with someone else to get delivered – we prefer to handle that ourselves. Grown only in the finest farms, and cared for by the finest professionals in the business, our roses are the finest and most beautiful roses you will find for your Valentine.

When you send flowers from Durocher Florist, you can rest assured that not only are you sending the very best professionally designed and hand-delivered flowers, but you are always backed by an unconditional guarantee that is unmatched in the industry. Exceed her expectations this year and leave the details to us. Call Durocher Florist today to make this Valentine’s Day one that will truly be remembered.

Pantone’s color of the year for 2018 is Ultra Violet

Image: Pantone

As a nod to inventiveness and imagination – with a little tribute to Prince mixed in for good measure – Pantone has chosen Ultra Violet as color of the year for 2018.

Ultra Violet (18-3838) is a deep, rich blue-based purple that, according to Pantone, communicates originality, ingenuity, and visionary thinking. Pantone goes on to describe their pick of the provocative purple shade as a tribute to the unknown

This year’s color selection is a stark contrast to the past four years which have consisted of softer and more muted colors such as Greenery in 2017, the duo of Rose Quartz and the light blue Serenity in 2016, along with the wine-colored Marsala of 2015. Prior to that, Pantone used a lighter shade of purple in 2014 with their selection of Radiant Orchid.

Amazing Grace Bouquet by Durocher Florist

The bold purple may be a curious choice for some, but a closer look reveals that the opposing colors that make up Ultra Violet – red and blue – are largely symbolic of the polarizing American political climate of 2017 along with the hope that we can become more unified in 2018.

Aside from the political overtones, Ultra Violet is just a fun color that comes at a time when we could all use a little more fun in our lives. The dynamic shade of Purple also fits perfectly in the floral industry since it can be such an eye-catching accent color.

Lilacs, sage, clematis, and allium are close matches for Ultra Violet, but there are other options as well. Carnations, Lily of the Nile, anemones, hyacinth, chrysanthemums, hydrangea, and orchids can also be closely matched to Ultra Violet, as can a multitude of other varieties.

Now is your chance to jump on this new trend in its infancy. Your friends at Durocher Florist are ready to help you select the perfect bouquet featuring 2018’s hottest color – Ultra Violet. Only time will tell if this year’s color of the year is prophecy, but even if not, it’s still a fun shade to use.

Image: Pantone

How Did Poppies Become the Symbol of Veterans Day?

Honoring service members has been a hot-button issue in our country as of late. No matter what your political stance is on the topic, we can surely all agree that those who served this great country deserve to be recognized, and Veterans Day, on Friday, November 10, is an opportunity to do just that.

Veterans Day, which is observed annually on November 11 (or on Friday, November 10 if the 11th falls on a Saturday – as is the case this year), is often confused with the more widely-recognized Memorial Day, but there is a distinct difference between the two holidays.

Memorial Day honors those who died while serving in the military, while Veterans Day is meant to honor the service of all U.S. military veterans. So, technically, thanking a living vet for their service on Memorial Day is missing the intended meaning of the holiday. Obviously, there isn’t a “wrong” time to thank a veteran, but if you’re going to pick a day to do so, Veterans Day is it!

Just how did this holiday get its start? It all started back in 1926 when the U.S. Congress adopted a resolution requesting that President Calvin Coolidge issue annual proclamations calling for an observance of November 11 – notable because World War I formally ended at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, when the Armistice with Germany went into effect.

It took 12 years for a Congressional Act to officially make the 11th of November in each year a legal holiday. Originally known as Armistice Day in the United States, the name was changed to Veterans Day in 1954.

Poppies

Like many other holidays, Veterans Day has a direct tie to the floral industry with poppies being symbolic of the observance. Many poppy wreaths are laid at war memorials and small artificial poppies are worn on clothing to commemorate this patriotic holiday.

Inspired by the World War I poem “In Flanders Fields,” in which the opening lines refer to poppies that were the first flowers to grow in the soil from soldiers’ graves in the Flanders region of Belgium, these small red flowers were adopted by the National American Legion as their official symbol of remembrance in 1920.

The Royal British Legion soon after adopted the poppy as their symbol, as did veterans’ groups in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, as well as a host of other countries.

Although they are closely related, the poppies used for Veterans Day (as well as Memorial Day) are not the same species as the opium poppy which is grown as a field crop to produce opium and poppy seeds. Opium poppies were once prohibited in the United States under the Opium Poppy Control Act of 1942, however, the law has since been repealed and the law of poppy cultivation in the U.S. is now somewhat vague and remains controversial.

Coincidently, the red remembrance poppies aren’t free from controversy of their own. In fact, some anti-war groups view the remembrance poppy as a political symbol of war and conflict. The controversy has even spread to the sports world and particularly European soccer clubs where remembrance poppies are a common occurrence on team uniforms in the run-up to Remembrance Day.

Some groups have adopted white poppies as an alternative to, or an accompaniment to, red poppies as a way to symbolize peace without glamorizing war. Additionally, purple poppies are sometimes used in Britain to commemorate animals that have been victims of war.

Regardless of the controversies surrounding this little red flower, you’re probably going to see them “popping” up around town this week. When you do, remember to take a moment to give thanks to all the veterans who serve – or have served – our country.

Chrysanthemums: The Ultimate Fall Flower

Golden Amber Bouquet by Durocher Florist

We often associate certain flowers with certain times of the year. Red roses, for example, are an iconic symbol of Valentine’s Day, and spring never really arrives until the tulips start popping up. Poinsettias usher in the holiday season while sunflowers remind us of lazy late-summer days.

But when it comes to fall, chrysanthemums are the star of the season – especially during the month of November. With their brilliant colors and long-lasting nature, mums can brighten up any front porch or indoor space. Many people, however, do not realize the deep symbolism behind this favorite autumn icon.

In Chinese culture, this flowering herb symbolizes a life of ease and longevity. Together with the plum blossom, the orchid, and bamboo, chrysanthemums are renowned as one of the “Four Gentlemen” in Chinese and Eastern Asian art and are depicted in traditional ink and wash painting

The earliest illustrations of mums show them to be daisy-like flowers that are small and yellow in color. Today’s chrysanthemums can be quite showy and would probably not be recognized by ancient growers. Modern chrysanthemums can be daisy-like or decorative, like pompons or buttons. In addition to the traditional yellow color, mums can now also be found in a variety of whites, purples, and reds.

Around the 8th century A.D., the chrysanthemum appeared in Japan and was so admired that it was adopted as the crest and official seal of the emperor. The western world was not introduced to the mum until the 17th century and it first appeared in American horticulture in 1798 when Colonel John Stevens imported a variety called ‘Dark Purple’ from England.

Just as the season the represent, chrysanthemums are known for being hardy and strong while also presenting an unmistakable sense of beauty and intrigue. Consider including some mums the next time you order flowers so that you can enjoy these amazing flowers! The Golden Amber Bouquet from Durocher Florist is a perfect way to spread some autumnal cheer!

 

Did You Know???

  • Golden Amber Bouquet by Durocher Florist

    Despite their strong presence in the fall, chrysanthemums are tropical flowers that were originally grown in the Eurasian region.

  • In the Victorian language of flowers, yellow chrysanthemums are a gentle way to decline amorous advances and white mums encourage the recipient to tell the truth or to be honest.
  • The chrysanthemum is November’s birth flower. If you are born in November, the mum is symbolic of your soul’s many layers.
  • In Eastern meditative traditions, the chrysanthemum is used as a focus tool to activate the heart chakra.
  • Germans have white chrysanthemums in their homes on Christmas Eve as a symbol of Christ.
  • The name, chrysanthemum, is adapted from the Greek word, “chryos” which means gold (the original color) and “athos” meaning flower.
  • Some species of chrysanthemum flowers are boiled to make tea in parts of Asia. Likewise, a rice wine in Korea called gukhwaju is flavored with chrysanthemum flowers.
  • The chrysanthemum was recognized as the official flower of the city of Chicago by Mayor Richard J. Daley in 1966.

Know Your Flower Etiquette

We all know that flowers make wonderful gifts for a variety of different circumstances. It’s hard to go wrong with choosing flowers as a gift, but there are a few rules of etiquette that should be followed when giving flowers on certain occasions.

Choosing the right flowers

  • While there are no definitive rules about what kind of flowers to send, certain types or colors of flowers may be inappropriate depending on the circumstance. A dozen red roses typically suggest romance and may send an unintended message if you are giving them to a co-worker or casual acquaintance.
  • White or light yellow flowers are usually the best choices for sympathy flowers. You certainly will want to avoid bright colored flowers in most instances.
  • Bright colored flowers, however, are almost always appropriate for happy occasions or milestones such as birthdays, anniversaries, congratulations, or thank yous.
  • When thanking someone, choose their favorite flower or favorite color instead of the cheapest option, the extra effort on your part will be appreciated and it makes your gratitude appear more personal and genuine.

Timing is everything

  • Some hospitals prohibit flowers, so check to make sure they’re allowed if you are sending them there. The local florists should know which hospitals accept them, and which do not. If the recipient’s hospital visit is brief, consider sending them to the home after they are dismissed.
  • While many people prefer to send sympathy flowers directly to the funeral home, it is perfectly acceptable to send them to the family’s home afterward. It’s even okay to wait a week or two in order to let the family know you’re still thinking of them.
  • Birthdays, holidays and anniversary are obvious occasions for sending flowers, but giving flowers “out of the blue” or “on a whim” are more impactful, especially if the recipient is not expecting a gift.
  • If you are late hearing about an occasion, but still wish to send flowers, be sure to mention that to the recipient – otherwise, the timing may seem odd to them.

Consider the recipient

  • Size matters, so consider where the flowers are going and what will happen to them after they’re delivered. Designs that are too small may not send the appropriate message you wish to convey, but larger gifts may be intrusive in small offices or rooms – especially if they’re shared with other people.
  • Putting yourself in the recipient’s shoes and asking yourself how you would feel receiving the gift should give you a good idea of what is appropriate.
  • Do some research when sending flowers to people from different cultures. Some cultures have stigmas against certain colors or flowers, and you don’t want to misconstrue your message or create an obligation to reciprocate.
  • Sending sympathy flowers If a family specifically asks for donations in “lieu of flowers” is a breach of etiquette, even if you mean well. In circumstances such as this, a fruit basket or other memorial item may be appropriate if you would still like to send a gift.

Flowers are such an excellent way to convey a personal sentiment, so it’s important to consider the message you are wishing to express. When in doubt, give us a call and let us know the circumstance and we’ll help you select the perfect gift!

National Poinsettia Day – December 12

Dark red poinsettias, with dramatic lighting against a black backgroundToday is National Poinsettia Day. If you think this is just another one of those wacky observance days that seem to take place every single day of the year (yesterday was both National Mountain Day, and National Light a Candle Day) you’re in for a surprise. In fact, the United States has observed this official day since the mid-1800s in honor of the passing of the first American ambassador to Mexico, Joel Roberts Poinsett, and the plant he introduced to the U.S.

In 1828, Poinsett discovered the plant with vivid red leaves by the side of a road in Mexico and sent some cuttings home to his residence in South Carolina. Initially, many botanists dismissed the Poinsettia as a weed, but Poinsett’s work with the plant caused it to eventually gain acceptance as a holiday plant.

The holiday season is always a special time in the floral industry, and the star of the show is, of course, the venerable Poinsettia plant. According to a 2013 US Department of Agriculture report, Poinsettias are the highest selling potted flowering plant in America and account for nearly one-quarter of sales of all flowering potted plants throughout the entire year.

So how did the Poinsettia plant end up associated with Christmas? According to Mexican legend, a poor child who could not afford a gift for Christ on Christmas Eve was told that a humble gift, if given with love, would suffice in God’s eyes. The child carefully picked some weeds from the side of a road and brought them to church as a gift to make God happy. As she entered the church, the weeds bloomed into beautiful red and green flowers and the congregation was sure they had witnessed a Christmas miracle. From that day on, Poinsettias were known as ‘Flores de Noche Buena,’ or ‘Flowers of the Holy Night.’

Here are some Poinsettia fun facts:

  • Poinsettias are native to southern Mexico and have been used in religious ceremonies and also to decorate churches there for centuries as the red color is a symbol of purity.
  • Contrary to popular belief, Poinsettias are not poisonous to people or pets, although the plant has been known to cause stomach irritation and discomfort if ingested. The danger to pets and children comes from the choking hazard of the fibrous parts of the plant, and not the toxicity.
  • Although every state in the U.S. grows Poinsettias commercially; for much of the past 100 years, the Ecke Ranch in California has grown over 70% of all Poinsettias purchased in the United States and accounted for about 50% of the Poinsettias sold worldwide.
  • The word Poinsettia is traditionally capitalized because it was named after a person.
  • The Poinsettia has its own college football bowl game. The Poinsettia Bowl debuted in San Diego in 1952 and originally served as the military services championship game for four years before being resurrected in 2005. This year’s matchup features BYU vs. Wyoming on December 21.
  • In the wild, Poinsettias have been known to grow over 12 feet tall.